Who was Turner anyway?

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A Turner Bugler, 2004

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News of 150 Years Ago–November and December 1864.

NEWS OF 150 YEARS AGO

November and December 1864

In the midst of a devastating civil war, the United States held its regular presidential election on November 8, 1864. The DEMOCRAT strongly endorsed the reelection of Abraham Lincoln.

From The Missouri Democrat, Wednesday, November 2, 1864.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

It is with more than ordinary pride and satisfaction, that we can look back upon our record during the pending Presidential canvass. It will not be denied that, in the outset, it required no little resolution to declare for Lincoln in the State of Missouri. The disloyal were, of course, hostile to him, while the Unionists of the State, who were mainly radical, were, as a general thing, far from satisfied with his re-nomination, on account of the policy he had pursued towards them. Hence, at the date of his nomination, it appeared extremely doubtful whether Mr. Lincoln could receive an effective support in this State. The timid refused to commit themselves in his favor. The time-serving and more ambitious for office made haste to array themselves in opposition, and we were earnestly admonished of the peril we encountered, should we give Mr. Lincoln our support, and were bitterly assailed by many who had been our friends, after doing so….

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After a summer during which President Abraham Lincoln despaired of any chance at reelection, recent successes of Union arms led to a strong victory by Lincoln and the Republicans over Democratic challenger Gen. George B. McClellan.

From The Missouri Democrat, Wednesday, November 9, 1864.

THE LATEST NEWS.

BY TELEGRAPH.

NATIONAL ELECTION!

Glorious Reports from All Quarters.

COUNTRY SAVED!

ANOTHER UPRISING OF THE PEOPLE.

THE PATRIOT SOLDIERS MAKE ANOTHER GRAND CHARGE.

Old Father Abraham going in With a “Whirl.”

STUNNING REBUKE TO THE REBELS.

THE CHICAGO PLATFORM KNOCKED INTO “PI.”

The Ship of State Still Afloat.

SENTENCE PASSED ON THE PEACE SNEAKS.

SNAKES, HUNT YOUR HOLES.

Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana and Ohio True to the Union.

LARGE UNION GAINS EVERYWHERE.

From Pittsburg.

[Special Dispatch to the Missouri Democrat.]

PITTSBURG, Nov. 8.—Alleghany [sic] county gives eighty-five hundred majority for Lincoln, and Philadelphia ten thousand. Scattering returns indicate a Union majority of fifteen to twenty thousand on the home vote….

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The DEMOCRAT exulted in the success of their preferred candidate.

From The Missouri Democrat, Wednesday, November 9, 1864.

LET THE PEOPLE ALL REJOICE.

Without exaggeration it can now be said that the “country is safe.” The lightning, which flashes along the telegraphic wire, brings “glad tidings of great joy” to all loyal men. And what is to us a matter of especial rejoicing is the fact that the city of St. Louis had not fallen far behind in devotion to the Government in its trial hour. Her voice goes out to swell the anthem of praises which ascend from glad hearts, over the victory which loyalty has won, and her efforts have not been wanting for its achievement. Missouri, too, has doubtless done her duty to her country in the emergency, by casting her vote for Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson; and to herself and her future she has rendered the highest service, by declaring for immediate freedom and rule by a Radical administration. We scarcely know how to take in all the important consequences which will flow from yesterday’s decision….

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The DEMOCRAT also did not hesitate to offer advice to the Chief Executive.

From The Missouri Democrat, Monday, November 14, 1864.

THE PEOPLE TO ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

There is no mistaking the verdict of the people last Tuesday. They did infinitely more than re-elect Mr. Lincoln. They proclaimed radical war against the rebellion—against not only the trunk and branches, but the roots of the full crime? The Union sentiment of the country is hearty and intense. The strong and great soul of the nation is all in it. Not opinion, however unanimous and clear; not self-interest, however potent, but rapt devotion to country, has just spoken at the ballot-box. The mighty spirit of the great people engaged in a terrible and terribly protracted war, can make no subtly false distinction. It can tolerate no special pleadings. It deals, and will deal, only with the naked fact as it stands plain to view, despite all the clouds of sophistry that bad men can raise around it.

Slavery made the war. It made it, not as a thinking and accountable personality, but as, in the nature of things, the efficient cause….

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Upon occupying Atlanta, Union General William T. Sherman considered his next move. After evacuating Atlanta, Confederate General John Bell Hood had moved his army north to threaten Sherman’s line of supply with Chattanooga, hoping to draw him out. Instead, Sherman tasked General George H. Thomas and his Army of the Cumberland with dealing with Hood, while Sherman took the remainder of his forces and struck out towards Savannah and the sea.

From The Missouri Democrat, Saturday, November 19, 1864.

FROM SHERMAN

HIS COLUMN IN MOTION.

Where They will Probably Strike.

THEY CARRY 60 DAYS RATIONS.

Atlanta Rendered Untenable

NO ENEMY TO INTERPOSE.

ETC., ETC., ETC.

We extract the following import details from the Cincinnati Evening Times, dated Nashville, 15th inst.:

One column of Sherman’s army left Atlanta on the 9th, taking the Macon road. They will pass through Milledgeville, and probably will make an effort to release the Union prisoners.

A second column left Saturday last, taking the direct road to Augusta, which will be reached in fourteen days.

Two columns are concentrated at Atlanta and will move on Charleston, Savannah or Beaufort is deemed proper. Beaufort was the original destination.

The Macon and Augusta railroads will be effectually destroyed as the army proceeds….

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While Sherman swept eastward through Georgia, Confederate General John Bell Hood marched into Tennessee. At Nashville, Union General George H. Thomas worked to concentrate his forces to meet Hood. Hood’s army fell on General John M. Schofield’s Army of the Ohio at Spring Hill, Tennessee, and then struck him hard the next day at Franklin.

From The Missouri Democrat, Friday, December 2, 1864.

FROM NASHVILLE, TENN.

THE BATTLE AT FRANKLIN.

Gen. Thomas’s Army in Position Three Miles South of Nashville.

Another Battle Momentarily Expected.

DISPATCH OF GEN. SCHOFIELD.

Full and Interesting Particulars.

PARTIAL LIST OF CASUALTIES.

ETC., ETC., ETC.

NASHVILLE, December 1.—The Federal forces under General Thomas retired from Franklin last night, and have taken position and formed a line of battle north of Nashville about three miles.

Skirmishing has been going on all day about five miles south of here. Heavy cannonading can be distinctly heard in the city.

No want of confidence is felt by the commanders in the ultimate success of the Federals….

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From The Missouri Democrat, Saturday, December 3, 1864.

FROM NASHVILLE, TENN.

THE LATE BATTLE AT FRANKLIN.

THE REBELS REPEATEDLY REPULSED

FURTHER AND FULLER DETAILS

NASHVILLE, Dec. 2.—I have received full accounts of the late battle at Franklin. It is one which must be chronicled is one of the most brilliant of the war. For three days sharp skirmishing was kept up during the retirement of our army from Duck river to Franklin, during which time a multiplicity of exploits and successes resulted to the national arms.

General Cox conducted the movement of the 29th ult., and claimed a splendid victory at Spring Hill, which General Wilson’s cavalry gained, and a series of important successes over General Forrest’s advance, under Roddy, on the Pike road, between Triune and Spring Hill….

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Despite the defeat at Franklin, Hood followed Schofield to Nashville, where Schofield joined Thomas’s army. After preparations and delays that nearly cost Thomas his command, Thomas attacked Hood on December 15 and routed his army, crippling it as an effective force.

From The Missouri Democrat, Monday, December 19, 1864.

GLORIOUS FROM NASHVILLE.

Another Battle Yesterday.

Hood’s Army Broken and Routed.

Much Artillery and Many Prisoners Captured.

OUR LOSS SLIGHT.

WASHINGTON, D. C., Dec. 17th, 1864.

To the Mayor of St. Louis:

The great battle between United States forces under Major General Thomas, and the rebel army under General Hood, before Nashville, took place yesterday.

It resulted in a great and decisive victory to the Union arms.

The rebel army has been broken and routed, a large portion of its artillery taken and great numbers of prisoners captured….

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Sherman’s “March to the Sea” was a triumph, demonstrating that Union forces could operate in the Confederate heartland at will, and destroying supplies and workshops essential to the Confederate war effort. On December 21, the city of Savannah, abandoned by the Confederate forces protecting it, surrendered to Sherman.

From The Missouri Democrat, Monday, December 26, 1864.

THE VERY LATEST.

GLORIOUS NEWS

CAPTURE OF

SAVANNAH

800 PRISONERS!

150 GUNS CAPTURED!

25,000 Bales of Cotton!

The Federal Fleet off Wilmington,

The dispatches of Gen. Sherman and Gen. Foster are as follows:

SAVANNAH, GA., December 22.—To His Excellency President Lincoln, I beg to present you a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah with 150 heavy guns and plenty of ammunition and also about 25,000 bales of cotton.

[Signed]      W. T. Sherman.

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From The Missouri Democrat, Wednesday, December 28, 1864.

FROM SHERMAN.

THE FALL OF SAVANNAH.

Full Confirmation of the News.

HIGHLY INTERESTING DETAILS

The dispatches of Gen. Sherman and Gen. Foster are as follows:

FORT MONROE, December 26.—The steamer California arrived here at a late hour last evening in 58 hours from Fort Pulaski, bringing important dispatches from General Sherman, and glorious confirmatory intelligence of the capture of Savannah on the 21st inst.

On the 20th Sherman having nearly completed the investment of the city and captured Fort Lee and several other minor outworks in the immediate vicinity of the principal entrenchments surrounding the city, and planting his siege guns in such close proximity to the rebel lines as to command effectually every position held by the forces under Gen. Hardee….

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