Who was Turner anyway?

Who was Turner anyway?

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A Turner Bugler, 2004

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News of 150 Years Ago–March-April 1865

NEWS OF 150 YEARS AGO

March-April 1865

In St. Louis and across the land, March 4, 1865, was declared a day of “joy and thankfulness” in honor of the second inauguration of Abraham Lincoln. The DEMOCRAT provided full details of the ceremonies.

From The Missouri Democrat, Monday, March 6, 1865.

The Inauguration Ceremonies—The Weather—Route of the Procession—Military and Civil Display—The Oath of Office, etc.

President Lincoln was inaugurated at 12 o’clock noon to-day. The weather was clear and beautiful, but on account of the recent rains the streets were filled with mud. Despite this fact the assemblage was exceedingly large and thousands proceeded to the capitol to witness the inauguration ceremonies. The procession moved from the corner of Sixteenth and Pennsylvania avenue. President Lincoln had been at the capitol all day, and consequently did not accompany the procession to the scene of the ceremonies….

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After nine months of siege at Petersburg, Virginia, Union forces under Gen. Ulysses S. Grant had finally cut the last Confederate supply line in March 1865. In a desperate attempt to disrupt Grant’s plans to assault Petersburg, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee launched his own attack against Fort Stedman, a strong point in the Union lines, on March 25. The attack failed. On April 1, Union Gen. Philip Sheridan defeated Confederate forces under Gen. George Pickett at Five Forks, southwest of Petersburg. A general Union assault on the Petersburg works followed on April 2, resulting in a full Confederate withdrawal that night and the surrender of Petersburg and Richmond. In an futile attempt to reach promised supplies,the Army of Northern Virginia retreated westward toward Appomattox Court House, losing men continually to battle losses, capture, and desertion along the way. Finally hemmed in on three sides, Lee surrendered his army. The DEMOCRAT was exultant with joy at the news that heralded the end of the war.

From The Missouri Democrat, Monday, April 10, 1865.

HALLELUJAH!

KEEP JUBILEE!

Fling Out Your Flags!

Fire all your Guns!

ILLUMINATE!

UNION AND PEACE!

CAPITULATION OF LEE!

HIS ARMY SURRENDERED!

Official from Sec’y Stanton.

PARTICULARS PROMISED….

FROM WASHINGTON.

OFFICIAL WAR DEPARTMENT,
WASHINGTON, April 9, 1865.

Major General Dix:

The official report of the surrender of General Lee and his army to General Grant, on the terms proposed by General Grant, will be given as soon as possible.

E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War.

Having transmitted the above appetize for momentous news, the telegraph last night failed to send more for the Associated Press. The promised details were, however, received at the Military Telegraph office, addressed to General Pope, but at so late an hour that the message was not delivered last night to the General. There is, however, no doubt of the authenticity of the dispatch above given, and none of the surrender of General Lee and his whole remaining army to Lieutenant-General Grant. The telegraph line worked badly, having broken down east of Cincinnati, and leaves us with the most meager dispatches from the East.—ED

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From The Missouri Democrat, Tuesday, April 11, 1865.

TE DEUM

LAUDAMUS!

FLOAT EVERY FLAG!

Fire Your Guns!

RING THE JOY BELLS!

ILLUMINATE!

Surrender of Lee!

Grant’s Terms Accepted!…

WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, April 9.—9 P. M.—To
Major General Pope, Commanding:
This Department has just received the official report of the surrender this day of General Lee and his army to Lieutenant General Grant, on the terms proposed by General Grant.

Details will be given as speedily as possible.

E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War.

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President Lincoln, having met Gen. Grant and Gen. William T. Sherman at City Point, Virginia, on March 27, toured Richmond from April 4 to 7. Returning to Washington, he addressed a jubilant crowd at the White House upon receiving news of Lee’s surrender. On April 14, 1865, he and Mrs. Lincoln attended a performance of the play Our American Cousin at Ford’s Theatre. There jubilation turned to tragedy.

From The Missouri Democrat, Saturday, April 15, 1865.

President Lincoln Shot.

Changing national joy to sorrow, there falls upon us, in truth “like a thunder clap from a clear sky,” the grievous and astounding intelligence that President Lincoln was last night fatally shot in Washington. The dispatches relating this horror will be read with an agony of interest.

 

From The Missouri Democrat, Saturday, April 15, 1865.

EXTRA NIGHT REPORT.

HORRIBLE

THE PRESIDENT
SHOT!!

His Speedy Death Expected!

Secretary Seward Assassinated!

Fearful Details!

[Special to the Western Associated Press.]

WASHINGTON, April 15—12:30 A. M.—The President was shot in a theatre to night, and is perhaps mortally wounded.

SECOND DISPATCH.

The President is not expected to live through the night. He was shot in a theater.

Secretary Seward Assassinated.

Secretary Seward was also assassinated. No arteries were cut.

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The DEMOCRAT mourned along with the nation. The editors correctly prophesied Lincoln’s place in pantheon of great Presidents but was overly optimistic about the convictions and abilities his successor, Andrew Johnson.

From The Missouri Democrat, Monday, April 17, 1865.

THE NATION’S LOSS.

In ordinary times, the death of a successful and popular Chief Magistrate of the Republic would be felt as a dire calamity, and his sudden taking off by the hand of violence would add the shock of horror to the bitterness of grief. But such a removal of such a President in this crisis of the Nation is among the most startling and impressive events of this fateful period. The public mind is stunned by the rudeness and magnitude of the blow, and emotions of sorrow for the victim, indignation for the murderer, horror for the crime and anxiety for the stricken country are struggling for adequate utterance….

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